Tim Byrne Podcasts

Tim continues his election coverage this week by travelling to Markham, Ontario. He’s invited young up and comer Abdul Malik to join him this week. Abdul is just 30 years old and that’s why Tim wanted to sit down with him. The pair don’t always see eye to eye politically. But they didn’t stop them from having a lively debate. The hot topic in Ontario these days is Doug Ford’s decision to chop the size of Toronto city council in half. Tim loves this idea. He thinks that government is too slow and unresponsive. It sometime takes years to get a decision that should only take months. Abdul is less excited about the proposal. He think that democracy requires more voices to be heard. Reducing the number of councillors might speed things up but it will also reduce the number of people who have a real say in city government. Abdul has lived in Markham since 1999. During that time, he says, there has been an incredibly low number of new facilities built for the quickly growing community. Community centres and other public facilities are just taking way too long to be built. He has put growth at the center of his campaign. Connect http://abdulmalik.ca/
S02E08 – Markham has a mayor (just not sure who)
Tim continues his election coverage this week by travelling to Markham, Ontario.  He’s invited young up and comer Abdul Malik ...
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These are exciting times in Ontario. Towns and cities across our fair province will be hiring new mayors in October. The political landscape has changed a lot over the last four years. Donald Trump has really shook things up. I don’t like everything that Trump does but he has made every stand-up and have an opinion. I think there’s a real benefit to that. Over the next few weeks I’m going to be speaking with several mayoral candidates. I want find out where they stand on the issues that I’m really passionate about - namely small business, taxes and PC culture. Today, I’ve invited Toronto mayoral candidate Gautam Nath to join me in the studio. This is the first time Gautam has ever run for elected office. It’s expensive to enter politics and Nath has depended on volunteers to help his candidacy. Nath worked in finance for big multinationals for years and wants to bring that expertise to local government. “The mayor is in the best position to make sure things happen for the people of Toronto,” he says. One of Tim’s biggest complaints about the Wynne government was her decision to raise the minimum wage. He thinks that if you give someone a handout it diminishes their incentive to work. Gautam thinks there is an analogy to the way Canada’s economy has operated for years. For too long, he says, Canadians depended on exports to the US. The 2008 recession made us realize that we have to diversify our markets. It made us work harder to compete in a global market. So what about John Tory? He’s been everywhere over the last few weeks but, in Nath’s eyes, totally absent for the previous four years. Tory was elected on the promise of creating the SmartTrack. “We’re still waiting to see where the smart starts and where the track begins,” Nath says. Nath believes it’s time for a change and voters are hungry for something that’s real. We’ll find out when Torontonians go to the polls on Oct 22. Connect https://gn4mayor-to.ca/
S02E07 – Who’s your mayor?
These are exciting times in Ontario.  Towns and cities across our fair province will be hiring new mayors in October ...
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In the second part of Tim’s visit to the good folks at Curb Signs he takes questions from a thoroughly overwhelmed audience. Tim’s truth bombs had left the group somewhat shaken but they were still in good spirits when the first brave member of the audience raised his hand. “What do you do if you have a client that obviously doesn’t like you,” they ask. Tim loves this question because it’s one of the most common problems a salesperson has to deal with. Tim refers to the book The Speed of Trust which he loves because it speaks directly to this issue. People will not like. There’s no fixing it. Period. The best thing to do? Phone your competitor and give them a heads up that there is some business for them at this company. Your competitor will be flabbergasted but Tim believes strongly that you need to do as well with your competitors as you do with your clients. The most important asset you have as a business is the level of trust you have in the industry. The next question is about branding. Years ago Tim advocated that Stadia change all their branding to pink. They drive Pink trucks and wear pink camo shirts. Tim did this for a couple of reasons. The first is that the colour stands out. But more importantly it makes Stadia’s workers more vulnerable in front of their clients. Building intimacy with your clients is really hard and Tim believes the pink shirts are a simple way of doing that. The one lesson Tim really wanted to impart to the crew at Curb Signs is that becoming a great salesperson is a lot like working out. To get results you have to be consistent everyday. You have to setup a process that includes cold calls, appointments and social functions. Set daily goals that will become a daily routine that will end up making shitpile of money for everyone!
S02E06 – Kicked to the Curb and Still Naked
In the second part of Tim’s visit to the good folks at Curb Signs he takes questions from a thoroughly ...
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There are few things more painful in life than being dragged into a corporate workshop. That is until you go to a Tim Byrne corporate workshop. Instead of the usual droning on about sales projections and team building you get a Tasmanian Devil whirlwind of foul-mouthed truth speak. The good folks at Curb Signs Inc. made the fateful decision to invite our hero to their office in Aurora to deliver a lecture on all things sales. “Everything you do is too expensive.” Every sales person hears that every day. But that’s bullshit, according to Tim. Well, most of the time anyways. 33% of the time you’re not too expensive compared to your competitor. You’re too expensive for their budget. It’s all about how they build their budgets. Property managers will always move numbers around to make it look like they’re saving their clients money. Often times they will take money out of the budget for your work and stick it somewhere else - leaving you with nothing. So when they tell you you’re too expensive it has nothing to do with your estimate. The other 33% of the time you lost the job because they don’t like you. It’s only that last 33% where you will actually lose a job because you were undercut by a competitor. Building relationships is by far the hardest job a sales person has to master. Sales people will do anything to avoid having to go to yet another social function where they awkwardly stand in the corner talking to people they already know. Those events are about building new relationships! The easiest thing about the job is writing the purchase order or bidding the job. Shaking hands and meeting people is fucking awful. Cold calling is the worst of the worst. But it’s the only way you’re going to be successful so you better get good at it and quick. The only thing your organization is going to need in the next few decades is people that know how to talk to people. Most of the jobs in big companies are going to be automated. Building relationships is the only thing matters.
S02E05 – The Naked Truth (On Being Too Expensive)
There are few things more painful in life than being dragged into a corporate workshop.  That is until you go ...
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Tim is outnumbered in this week’s episode. He’s invited two superstar young women to join him for a conversation about the business of facilities management. Kat Byrne is a familiar voice to regular listeners of the podcast. She’s the General Manager of Byrne on Demand and has the far more difficult job of being Tim’s daughter. Kat is joined by Angelica Levesque, a former Byne employee and now a Senior Project Manager with Promain Exteriors. The conversation starts with Tim marvelling at the driving habits of both his guests. Angelica now has a company car which surprises Tim. “Haven’t both of you nearly lost your licenses?” he asks. They have and Tim starts to say that men are better drivers than women but then stops himself. “I got stopped in Quebec last weekend going 140 in an 80 zone,” he says. So that answers that. Angel has mostly worked for small companies like Byrne and Promain but she does have some limited corporate experience. A short stint pouring coffee at Tim Horton’s convinced her that there is no creativity working for a big business. Promain works with mostly with Ontario customers who often do business in Western Canada. Angelica thinks that there isn’t the same kind of urgency in the West as there is in Ontario. Managing customer expectations is a big part of her job. All three agree that working with Canadians is way better than dealing with Americans. It’s not because they are worse people. They just don’t understand Canada and treat their Northern stores as an afterthought. Tim quickly becomes bored of this conversation about business and shifts the conversation to a far more interesting topic. “Did you know that 47% of employees masterbate in the office?” he asks. The girls are astonished by that figure. It disturbing to think about in an office like BOD with 27 employees. It’s gets far more disturbing when thinking about Promain’s office which has just 3 employees. “I don’t want to think about this,” Angelica says.
S02E04 – Two Girls and a Dog of Facilities
 Tim is outnumbered in this week’s episode.  He’s invited two superstar young women to join him for a conversation ...
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Tim has an absolutely phenomenal guest in the studio this week. Not only because he’s a great guy but because the company he works for is absolutely trouncing the marketplace these days. William Stefancic is the commercial sales manager with 1-800-GOT-JUNK. Will moved started with the company when he was a student working in the trucks. He worked his way through the ranks and took over commercial sales when he was barely in his 30’s. The company grew quickly by focussing on the residential waste removal. Will has been tasked with putting a new emphasis on commercial customers. That’s where Tim comes in. Tim is pretty interested in all the weird stuff William has come across during his decade with the company. The list William provides definitely meets the definition of “weird”. You can only imagine the stuff you find crawling through basements, backyards and storage spaces. “You meet a pretty wide spectrum of humanity in this job,” Will says. “Hoarders, abandoned buildings and overgrown yards are a normal part of the job.” The Toronto franchise of 1-800-GOT-JUNK is by far the largest in the country. It was started by Paul Guy who after meeting founder Brian Scudamore became the company’s first franchisee. Unfortunately, he was in Vancouver at the time and had to drive a waste removal truck all the way to Toronto to start the business. Will finds that story particularly inspiring. When he was first starting with the company, spending his days bouncing around in a hot garbage truck, he made the decision to do his absolute best at a job that other might have found beneath them. That hard work and dedication has paid off. If you have an office filled with old office furniture or a project manager with storage lockers filled with people’s abandoned stuff Will is your man. He and 1-800-GOT-JUNK are aggressively courting commercial customers. Tim thinks commercial leasing guys are particularly desperate for dependable waste removal. “The property manager has a huge problem finding the right labour source for waste removal,” Tim says. For one price, William says, 1-800-GOT-JUNK will sort you out. Contact William Stefancic 416-572-0067
S02E03 – Touch my junk!
Tim has an absolutely phenomenal guest in the studio this week. Not only because he’s a great guy but because ...
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S02E02 – An architect’s nightmare on my street
The relationship between architects and tradespeople is sometimes less than congenial. Today Tim tries to fix that. He’s invited Stephen ...
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Things are about to change in the building trades. The Ontario government has decided to radically overhaul the Construction Lien Act. The first set of changes came into effect July 1st. Tim decided he needed a crash course and asked lawyer Olga Morozova to join him for a chat. Olga has worked for all levels of the construction business and knows what’s about to change. One of the biggest changes is that, for the first time, the government mandates time frames for payment. Owners must pay within 28 days of receiving an invoice. Olga says the old days of contractors blaming the owner for lack of payment are over. Getting paid your holdback is another big issue in the trades. Because you can lien the holdback Olga is telling all her owner clients to pay that money within 60 days. Tim wants to know why screwing over subcontractors has become so common. Tim thinks the big contractors and owners have systems in place to stop or slow payment. He once had someone inside an accounting department tell him that it was policy to reject 10% of all invoices. A lot of subcontractors are barely hanging on because giant firms aren’t paying their invoices on time. Olga says she sees this all too often. She says your first call should be to your lawyer. Tim has only placed about three liens in 30 years of work. He’s one of the lucky ones. For a lot of companies liens are a common part of the business. The changes to the law allow subcontractors more time to “preserve” and “perfect” the lien. Olga explains those definitions to Tim and reveals why they are so important. The changes to the act are long overdue. The last time the law was updated was over 35 years ago. Making it easier for subs to actually get paid on time will be a huge boon to the industry. Only time will tell if the law will really make those changes.Things are about to change in the building trades. The Ontario government has decided to radically overhaul the Construction Lien Act. The first set of changes came into effect July 1st. Tim decided he needed a crash course and asked lawyer Olga Morozova to join him for a chat. Olga has worked for all levels of the construction business and knows what’s about to change. One of the biggest changes is that, for the first time, the government mandates time frames for payment. Owners must pay within 28 days of receiving an invoice. Olga says the old days of contractors blaming the owner for lack of payment are over. Getting paid your holdback is another big issue in the trades. Because you can lien the holdback Olga is telling all her owner clients to pay that money within 60 days. Tim wants to know why screwing over subcontractors has become so common. Tim thinks the big contractors and owners have systems in place to stop or slow payment. He once had someone inside an accounting department tell him that it was policy to reject 10% of all invoices. A lot of subcontractors are barely hanging on because giant firms aren’t paying their invoices on time. Olga says she sees this all too often. She says your first call should be to your lawyer. Tim has only placed about three liens in 30 years of work. He’s one of the lucky ones. For a lot of companies liens are a common part of the business. The changes to the law allow subcontractors more time to “preserve” and “perfect” the lien. Olga explains those definitions to Tim and reveals why they are so important. The changes to the act are long overdue. The last time the law was updated was over 35 years ago. Making it easier for subs to actually get paid on time will be a huge boon to the industry. Only time will tell if the law will really make those changes.
S02E01 – We finally get paid!
Things are about to change in the building trades. The Ontario government has decided to radically overhaul the Construction Lien ...
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Selling is hard. It’s exhausting physically. It’s exhausting mentally. It’s not for the faint of heart. Tim tries to drive that message home this week when he is once again joined by his sales guys Dylan and Andy. It’s all about the psychology of selling and why the hardest part of the job is dealing with what’s going on in your own head. The episode starts with a conversation about embarrassing yourself on the job. You have to be prepared to do it. Tim shares just such a story. Earlier this year he met with the head of one of Stadia’s biggest clients. The guy is a major power player in Ontario construction. He’s way too busy to be taking meetings with Tim. Yet Tim, somehow, managed to get just such a meeting. It was a hot day. Really hot. And Tim decided to where one of his nicest shirts. It was a purple shirt. Arriving early Tim sat on the patio directly facing the scorching summer sun. By the time the bigshot arrived Tim’s purple shirt was soaking wet. The pit stains stretched down to belt. The big shot was clearly weirded out and he hasn’t taken Tim’s call since. The point of that horror story is that you have to be prepared to look stupid. “If you’re not putting yourself outside of your comfort zone every day you’re not going to make it,” Tim says. It's going to take a while to get comfortable with yourself in the job.
Timology 5 – The Psychology of Selling
Selling is hard.  It’s exhausting physically.  It’s exhausting mentally. It’s not for the faint of heart.  Tim tries to drive ...
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Timology 4 – Tim’s Tips for Sales Guys
 Tim needed an audience for this week's episode so he invited Stadia sales guys Dylan and Andy into the ...
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Timology 3 – Tim’s Podcast About Podcasts
"Why are you doing this?"  Tim gets asked that all the time.  Other business owners were totally mystified when Tim ...
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In the first episode in this series Tim outlined the mathematical formula every great salesman needs to follow. Marketing + relationships + accounting = a sale. Today he reveals the secret to building relationships. It’s a lot like dating. Would you walk up to someone in the bar and say “Hi! I’m really good looking and I’m great in bed.”? It wouldn’t work. It’s the same in sales. You need to form actual relationships with actual people before you can expect to sell anything. Building a relationship starts by getting people to remember your name. Then it’s learning the other person’s name and using it at least three times in a conversation. You’re trying to build intimacy and that can’t happen if you don’t know the other person's name. Tim uses all sorts of tricks to get people on the phone. That isn’t easy these days. Try and avoid voicemail at all costs. But if you have to leave a message make sure your name and number are at the front of the message. Do anything you can think of to get a callback. Tim will record happy birthday on a voicemail whether it’s the person’s birthday or not. Long before you ever seal a deal you need to know your client. It’s the same as dating. Most people don’t hop into bed on the first date. And if they do it tends to be a little weird. You have to build an actual relationship before you get lucky! At minimum you’re going to need at least four interactions with your client (lunch, phone calls, a meeting on-site) before you sign any contracts.
Timology 2 – Why selling is like dating
In the first episode in this series Tim outlined the mathematical formula every great salesman needs to follow.  Marketing + ...
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Tim is excited to launch a brand new series for the summer. His “Timology” series will reveal the secrets of great salesman. Tim came by this knowledge the hard way - years of failing. For over 20 years Tim scratched and crawled his way to building a successful business. Along the way he developed a winning strategy for selling his products and services. Tim says that three are three facets to being great in sales. Those are relationship building, marketing and accounting. In today’s episode Tim talks about the importance of building a relationship with a client. Tim likens building those relationships to being a successful political candidate. You have to shake one hundred hands to get one vote. The math is similar in sales. You have to introduce yourself to one hundred people to get one sale. Building a relationship with a client depends on personal contact. Tim insists on taking a potential client out for a drink or a meal before taking them on. If they don’t have time for that Tim isn’t interested in working with them. You need to become friends with your clients otherwise you won’t be able to depend on them for future business. There is a lot of negativity around sales. There is a common idea that sales people are scumbags who will say anything to get your money. And to be sure there are plenty of guys like that out there. Tim takes an opposite approach. If you are the only one walking away happy you’re doing it wrong. You don’t just bid jobs in order to bid jobs. You have a moral obligation to give the client a fair price.
Timology 1 – The Secret to Being a Great Sales Guy
Tim is excited to launch a brand new series for the summer.  His “Timology” series will reveal the secrets of ...
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Tim celebrates Season 1 with a retrospective episode featuring some of the funniest, dumbest and most offensive clips from the last 20 episodes.  The episode features perhaps the most important conversation ever featured in the podcast.  Back in Episode 7 discussed where the best bathroom can be found in downtown Toronto.  Tim is immediately interested in this line of conversation having visited every public washroom in the GTA over the last 30 years. Tim excitedly describes Crown Property Management’s bathrooms near the airport which have alcohol wipes that can be used to wipe down the seat prior to use. The pair then debate which building has the best washrooms in the downtown core. For the longest time Tim used Atrium on the Bay because for years the loading dock manager would let him use the second floor washrooms. (This was before the age of the security guard, of course). Next we return to one of the more disturbing tales ever spun on the podcast.  In Episode 8 Tim welcomed his old mentor Bill Stallon onto the podcast.  Together they recounted one of their more memorable adventures together at Beaver Valley. The group retired to a hot tub after a large steak dinner. Because no one had swim trunks that meant everyone was naked. Not having anything to drink one of the hosts offered a full bottle of XO Cognac.  After drinking the entire bottle Bill was now soundly asleep, happily bobbing in the tub.  What followed next was a heroic attempt to move the much larger Bill out of the Tim.  After dragging Bill like a corpse across a frozen threshold they left him in the laundry room. (Covered up for modesty’s sake.) Along with these classic tales the blooper episode also features Anthony Vinzi noting that Tim looks like a vagrant and the story of Tim's insane attempt to break the sound barrier in a brand new Porsche.  It's been a great first season!  Hope to see you when season two gets underway in the fall!
Episode 21 – Blooper Special
Tim celebrates Season 1 with a retrospective episode featuring some of the funniest, dumbest and most offensive clips from the ...
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Tim heads back into the office and welcomes longtime colleague Jeff Amos onto the podcast this week. Jeff has worked with Stadia for 14 years or as Tim likes to say “since Jesus was a cowboy.” Jeff came on-board as a part time worker when he was in his early 20’s. Tim and Jeff went to the same high school and they start this week’s episode sharing war stories. Unsurprisingly, Tim was something of a difficult student. He politely told the principal to fuck off one day in Grade 12 and walked out the door, never to return. Ten years later that same principal invited Tim to speak to students about succeeding in business. That teacher told him that he didn’t remember many of the thousands of students he taught over the years. But he always remembered Tim Byrne. Jeff worked long enough installing glass that he ended up injuring himself on a number of occasions. The most egregious happened when he was working at the Bay Tower installing a piece of half inch glass in an office partition. The glass slipped broke and slammed into his arm. The doctors had to cut him open on multiple occasions to remove all the broken glass. That wasn’t the only injury. Once in the Stadia shop a piece of glass slid right through his hand slicing open both his palms. He was working with a Stadia hero named Ronnie who Jeff was desperate to impress. “Do you want to go to the hospital?” Ronnie asked. “Nope!” Jeff replied before taping up his hands with duct tape and finishing the work day. A lot has changed on the workplace safety front just in the last ten years. The days of never wearing gloves or safety glasses are long gone. “Have you ever been scared on the job?” Tim asks. Jeff quietly nods his head before launching into a harrowing story about installing glass on the CN Tower. They are 45 stories up and a gust of wind catches them on the swing stage. The stage was blown 15 feet straight up in the air before crashing back down. Everyone was tied in and secure and no tools were lost. But pants were definitely shit on that day. Jeff is often asked why he has worked at the same company for so long. It’s difficult to explain he says. “Everyone is fucked up,” he says. “But everyone cares about each other and that’s impossible to find anywhere else.” The culture is so strong at Stadia that employees who stop working with the company almost always eventually ask for their job back. If you are not as happy to come into work on Monday as you are when you leave on Friday you’re working at the wrong place.
Episode 20 – Hello Jeff Amos
 Tim heads back into the office and welcomes longtime colleague Jeff Amos onto the podcast this week.  Jeff has ...
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